KICP Friday Noon Seminars
KICP Seminars - Usually Fridays, 12 PM, ERC 401, unless otherwise specified.

Current & Future KICP Seminars
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
January 20, 2017Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering: signal or background?Jayden Newstead, Arizona State University
January 27, 2017From axion inflation to leptons, baryons and cosmological magnetic fields.Evangelos Sfakianakis, UIUC
February 3, 2017TBADouglas Applegate, The University of Chicago
February 17, 2017Cosmological Gravitational Waves and Their MemoriesYi-Zen Chu, University of Minnesota Duluth
February 24, 2017Standard Model Background of the Cosmological ColliderZhong-Zhi Xianyu, Harvard University
March 3, 2017The Latte Project: Simulating the Milky Way and its Satellite DwarfAndrew Wetzel, Carnegie Observatories, Caltech, UC Davis
March 10, 2017Precision searches for new physics using optically levitated microspheresDavid Moore, Yale University
March 17, 2017Kinetic Inductance Detectors for 100 GHz CMB PolarimetryAmy Lowitz, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering: signal or background?
January 20, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Jayden Newstead, Arizona State University

The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to coherent nuclear scattering of solar neutrinos. This presents an irreducible background to dark matter searches, the so called 'neutrino floor'. However, this effect that has yet to be observed and so provides an opportunity for discovery. Dedicated experiments are racing to observe this effect and use it as a probe of new physics. In this talk I will discuss the neutrino floor and present some dark matter models where the prospects for discovery are not so grim. Then I will introduce the MINER experiment, a Texas A&M effort to observe coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, and present its sensitivity to models of new physics.

From axion inflation to leptons, baryons and cosmological magnetic fields.
January 27, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Evangelos Sfakianakis, UIUC

Axions are attractive candidates for theories of large-field inflation that are capable of generating observable primordial gravitational wave backgrounds. These fields enjoy shift-symmetries that protect their role as inflatons from being spoiled by coupling to unknown UV physics. This symmetry also restricts the couplings of these axion fields to other matter fields. At lowest order, the only allowed interactions are derivative couplings to gauge fields and fermions. These derivative couplings lead to the biased production of fermion and gauge-boson helicity states during and after inflation. I will describe some recent work on preheating in axion-inflation models that are derivatively coupled to Abelian gauge-fields and fermion axial-currents.
For an axion coupled to U(1) gauge fields it was found that preheating is efficient for a wide range of parameters. In certain cases the inflaton is seen to transfer all its energy to the gauge fields within a few oscillations. Identifying the gauge field as the hypercharge sector of the Standard Model can lead to the generation of cosmologically relevant magnetic fields.
Coupling the inflaton-axion to Majorana fermions leads to the biased production of fermion helicity-states which can have interesting phenomenological implications for leptogenesis.

TBA
February 3, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Douglas Applegate, The University of Chicago

TBA

Cosmological Gravitational Waves and Their Memories
February 17, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Yi-Zen Chu, University of Minnesota Duluth

Standard Model Background of the Cosmological Collider
February 24, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Zhong-Zhi Xianyu, Harvard University

The Latte Project: Simulating the Milky Way and its Satellite Dwarf
March 3, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Andrew Wetzel, Carnegie Observatories, Caltech, UC Davis

Precision searches for new physics using optically levitated microspheres
March 10, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
David Moore, Yale University

Kinetic Inductance Detectors for 100 GHz CMB Polarimetry
March 17, 2017 | ERC 401 | 12:00 PM
Amy Lowitz, University of Wisconsin - Madison