YAAYS Class NSM5007 Electromagnetic Spectrum

Click here for Syllabus document.

Links to handouts:

Professors:

Professors' Contact Information

I. Catalog Description

NSM5007 The Electromagnetic Spectrum and Observing for Educators is a course for educators who want to have knowledge of all forms of light, from gamma rays and X-rays through the visible spectrum, to the infrared and radio wavelengths.  Teachers will participate in a series of classes and then document sessions where they teach the material to their students.

II. Purpose of the Course

This course is designed to introduce teachers to observing the full electromagnetic spectrum.  The teachers will also learn methods for teaching the materials to their students.  The work in the course will be based on Wisconsin and Illinois teaching and learning standards.

III.  Course Goals and Objectives

 

Objectives

 

Indicators

1.

The course should lead teachers to understand the full electromagnetic spectrum so as to be able to teach it to, their students.

1.

The teachers will demonstrate during class that they understand various spectroscopic effects.

2.

The course should lead the teachers to learn and be able to teach the winter and spring constellations

2.

The teachers will demonstrate during class that they can recognize the winter and spring constellations and demonstrate that they have taught the material to their students

3.

The course should lead teachers to learn the apparent motion of objects in the plane of the ecliptic including constellations and planets

3.

The teachers will demonstrate during class that they have observed the motion of objects in the plane of the ecliptic including constellations and planets and demonstrate that they have taught the material to their students.

4.

The course should lead the teachers to learn the apparent motion of circumpolar objects including stars and constellations.

4.

The teachers will demonstrate during class that they have learned the motion of circumpolar objects including constellations and stars and demonstrate that they have taught the material to their students.

 


IV. Illinois Teaching Standards (http://www.isbe.state.il.us/profprep/PDFs/ipts.pdf)

Standard 1 – Content Knowledge

The teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to students.

Standard 2 – Human Development and Learning

The teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of students.

Standard 3 - Diversity

The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Standard 4 – Planning for Instruction

The teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, and community, and curricular goals.

Standard 6- Instructional Delivery

The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Standard 7- Communication

The teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Standard 8- Assessment

The teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students.

 

Standard 10- Reflective and Professional Growth

The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

 

V. Wisconsin State Teaching Standards (http://www.cesa5.k12.wi.us/pdf/WiTeachS.pdf)

  1. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools in inquiry, and structures of the disciplines he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for pupils.

 

  1. The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and provide instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development.

 

  1. The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the barriers that impeded learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities

 

  1. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology to encourage children’s development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

 

  1. The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

 

  1. The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, pupils, the community, and curriculum goals.

 

  1. The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the pupil.

 

  1. The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effect of his or her choices and actions on pupils, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

 

VI.  Text and Materials

            
VII.     Evaluation Procedures

Individual grade in this course will be based on a total of 100% as described below.

100%- 90%  A
89%- 80%    B
79%- 70%    C

Attendance

Attendance is important. This is an activity oriented class.  In a spirit of fairness, make-up work will be assigned for excused absences.

Readings and Discussion

Reading the material before class is important for your success. There will be discussions focused around the content, and everyone is expected to participate. Comprehension of the content should be apparent in class discussion and lesson development

Teaching Activity

The teacher will create a teaching activity. They will use the activity with their students and video tape the students while they are doing the activity.  The activity can be a teaching aid, manipulative, bulletin board display, game, or file of activities that will facilitate the learning about telescopes or the night sky.

 

VIII. Ethics Statement

Aurora University’s core values include integrity and ethical behavior.   A community of learners, Aurora University students and faculty share responsibility for academic honesty and integrity. The University expects active participation and equitable contributions of students involved in group assignments.  Aurora University’s Code of Academic Integrity prohibits cheating, fabrication, plagiarism, obtaining an unfair  advantage, unauthorized access to computerized records or systems and facilitating academic dishonesty regardless of intent.

Cheating: intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise (e.g. exams).

Fabrication: intentional or unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise (e.g. paper reference).

Facilitating academic dishonesty: intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit academic dishonesty (e.g. allowing another to copy from your test).

Plagiarism: intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in any academic exercise (e.g. failing to cite references or taking verbatim from another source. (Aurora University Graduate Catalog Online)).

IX. Accommodations

In compliance with ADA guidelines, students who have a condition, either permanent or temporary, which might affect their ability to perform in the class are encouraged to inform the instructor at the beginning of the term.  Adaptations of teaching methods, class materials, including text and reading materials or testing, may be made as needed to provide for equitable participation.


X. Courtesy

Cell phones and pagers should be turned off during class sessions.  Children and others not registered for the course are not permitted to be present during class sessions.  Exceptions to the above may be made with the instructor prior to the class when there are extenuating circumstances.

 

Schedule

The course is scheduled to meet 6:00-8:15 PM in Feb. and March, then 7:00- 9:15 P.M. in April.  The dates listed are the current plan, but bad weather or major schedule conflicts may shift any session to an alternate week (e.g. a blizzard on Feb. 5 could shift that class to Feb. 12.)

The activities will be altered as appropriate to take advantage of the sky conditions or special situations.  Some nights and sky conditions are better for observing than others.

Unless students are notified otherwise, class sessions will always begin at GWC.  Some sessions may move to Yerkes soon after class begins.

Date

Focus

Assignment

Feb. 5 (postponed to 12th due to snow)

1. The Electromagnetic Spectrum is much more than visible light.
2. Only some wavelengths get through the Earth’s atmosphere
3. winter and circumpolar stars

Read Discovering the Universe  pp. 62-68

The Stars: A New Way to See Them (winter and circumpolar constellations)

 Feb. 19

1. Three kinds of spectra.
2. winter and circumpolar stars

Read Discovering the Universe  pp. 101-112

March 4

1.  Black-body radiation and applications.
2. winter and circumpolar stars

Read Discovering the Universe  pp. 94-100

April 8

1. Infrared astronomy
2. spring and circumpolar stars

Read Discovering the Universe  

Infrared Energy and Observatories: pp. 67-68; 86-87; 95-96; G-7; 100.

 

 

The Stars: A New Way to See Them (spring and circumpolar constellations)

April 22

1. Other non-optical astronomy
2. spring and circumpolar stars

Galaxies: Chapter 16 pp. 417-444

Cosmic Rays: pages 360-361

Astronomical Calendar: April, May, June

 

**Class participants will be required to submit their reports on all YAAYS activities they do with their students, along with a more detailed reflection on at least one of the activities. See form for reporting these records.