Welcome to http://www.handsonuniverse.org/activities/Explorations/Pluto/

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Finding Pluto!

    Which object is Pluto?

May 24, 2007 -- Compare two images taken hours apart.
Look from one picture to the other. If you glance back and forth, you might be able to notice an object which changes position. This is Pluto.

Make a Pluto Flip Book. Cut on lines. Fold back the information. Put the first image over second image. Tape at the top. When you flip you will see a moving dot.  This is Pluto.  Link to these images in fits format. Link to doc or pdf files.

Pluto is in this starfield. The picture was taken at Yerkes Observatory with the 24 inch telescope.  Date May 24, 2007, Universal Time 5 hours 18 minutes 56 seconds.
Pluto, Dwarf Planet

Date

  

May 24 2007

Time

 UT 

05:18:56

Yerkes Astrophysics Academy for Young Scientists (NSF)

Telescope

 

Yerkes 24 inch

Pluto is in this starfield. The picture was taken at Yerkes Observatory with the 24 inch telescope.  Date May 24, 2007, Universal Time 8 hours 05 minutes 46 seconds.
Pluto, Dwarf Planet

Date

  

May 24 2007

Time

 UT 

08:05:47

Yerkes Astrophysics Academy for Young Scientists (NSF)

Telescope

 

Yerkes 24 inch

http://sunra.lbl.gov/telescope2/wdb.cgi/hou/Images/query/30000216
http://sunra.lbl.gov/telescope2/wdb.cgi/hou/Images/query/30000219


Follow Pluto during June, 2002. One of these objects is Pluto.

Pluto is in this picture, but where? Follow Pluto's motion from night to night.   Link here to see where Pluto is from night to night.   These images were taken at Yerkes Observatory with the 24 inch telescope in June of 2002. 
 
Follow Pluto during four days in June, 2001.
Pluto: June 24, 25, 26, 27, 2001
Pluto is in each picture.  Study the star patterns.  Look for one object (Pluto) which changes position from night to night.   These images were taken by Hughes Pack and other HOU TRAs on June 24, 25, 26, and 27, 2001, at Yerkes Observatory with the 24 inch telescope,  2 minute exposures.  Follow Pluto's motion from night to night.   Link here for page with full jpeg images and links to fts files.  

Pluto, one night to the next!
These images were taken with a 0.40 meter telescope by Adam Block at NOAO, Kitt Peak, Arizona on June 22, and June 23, 1998. Pluto is one of the bright objects. Which one? Explain your reasoning to a friend or classmate.
kp_pluto1_2.jpg (21551 bytes)

Open both images, pluto1kp.fts and pluto2kp.fts.  Compare them to decide which object is the planet, Pluto.


Here's the same starfield, imaged one week apart.

pluto.jpg (8604 bytes) notpluto.jpg (6777 bytes)
Now you see Pluto!
Now you don't!

These images, pluto.fts and notpluto.fts, were taken with a 3.5 meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico by Dave Cole, on October 31 and November 7, 1997. Dave was working remotely from an exhibit at the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum.

Why do you think you cannot see Pluto in the second image?



Download these pluto images

astroline.jpg (9796 bytes)
June 2, 2007

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