KICP Colloquia: 2006
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
September 27, 2006Type 1a Supernovae from the CFHT Legacy SurveyEric Aubourg, APC Paris / Princeton University
October 11, 2006Massive Black Holes from Early Times to the PresentMarta Volonteri, Northwestern University
October 25, 2006The Origin of Spheroidal GalaxiesSandy Faber, University of California, Santa Cruz

Type 1a Supernovae from the CFHT Legacy Survey
September 27, 2006 | RI 480 | 3:30 PM | Host: Angela V. Olinto
Eric Aubourg, APC Paris / Princeton University

The Supernovae Legacy Survey aims at discovering and spectroscopically identifying 700 type-Ia SN during its five years of operations at CFHT in Hawaii. I will present the survey and the current constraints on matter and energy content of the Universe and on the dark energy equation of state parameter. I will focus on how we plan to increase the expected number of SN to about 1000 using an offline analysis and discuss perspectives of the survey.

Massive Black Holes from Early Times to the Present
October 11, 2006 | RI 480 | 3:30 PM | Host: Angela V. Olinto
Marta Volonteri, Northwestern University

I'll discuss models for the hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes, feeding pregalactic black hole seeds. Mergers and dynamical interactions, as well as their implications, will be critically addressed. I'll also discuss the constraints on the early evolution of the black holes required by the observations of z=6 quasars.

The Origin of Spheroidal Galaxies
October 25, 2006 | RI 480 | 3:30 PM | Host: Angela V. Olinto
Sandy Faber, University of California, Santa Cruz

For decades, the standard paradigm for spheroidal galaxy formation was the monolithic collapse theory, in which spheroids collapsed gravitationally in bulk and formed all their stars at very high redshift. This talk will examine evidence that has accumulated over the past year that suggests an extended formation period for spheroidal systems, with many of them forming rather recently via the quenching of blue, star-forming galaxies AFTER z = 1. The mechanism for this quenching is not well understood, but it might be feedback from active black holes. If true, the symbiosis is complete in that the galaxy gives birth to the black hole, but the black hole eventually determines the star-formation history of the galaxy.