KICP Colloquia
KICP Wednesday Colloquia - Usually Wednesdays, 3:30 PM, ERC 161, unless otherwise specified. Reception starts at 4:30 PM in ERC 161. For more information visit the KICP website.

Current & Future KICP Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
September 27, 2017First observation of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scatteringGrayson C Rich, Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab
October 11, 2017The Limits of CosmologyJoe Silk, IAP/JHU
January 24, 2018Cosmology results from PlanckSilvia Galli, IAP
February 7, 2018TBAPeter Adshead, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
May 23, 2018The Simons ObservatoryBrian Keating, UC San Diego

Past KICP Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
May 31, 2017Mapping the Cosmos with the Dark Energy Survey - sneak peek of the first year weak lensing resultsChihway Chang, University of Chicago
May 24, 2017Automated Object Classification for Large Scale Future Surveys: A Strong Lensing Example with Machine LearningCamille Avestruz, University of Chicago
May 17, 2017Fast Radio Bursts!Albert Stebbins, Fermilab
April 19, 2017Observing, Mapping and Mocking our Cosmic BeginningsJ. Richard Bond, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto
April 5, 2017News from PICO and COHERENTJuan I. Collar, University of Chicago
March 1, 2017 cancelledDigging into the Large Scale Structure of the UniverseShirley Ho, Berkeley Lab/ BCCP / Carnegie Mellon
February 8, 2017 cancelledDigging into the Large Scale Structure of the UniverseShirley Ho, Berkeley Lab/ BCCP / Carnegie Mellon
January 18, 2017The Milky Way's Dark CompanionsAlex Drlica-Wagner, Fermilab

The Milky Way's Dark Companions
January 18, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Alex Drlica-Wagner, Fermilab

PDF | Video
Our Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a host of small, dark-matter-dominated satellite galaxies. Over the past two years, the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) has nearly doubled the number of known Milky Way satellite galaxies compared to the previous 80 years combined. While these discoveries continue to help resolve the "missing satellites problem", they have also raised new questions about the influence of the Magellanic Clouds on the Milky Way's satellite population. In the near future, the rapidly growing population of dwarf galaxies will be sensitive to deviations from ΛCDM at small scales, while definitively testing whether the annihilation of dark matter particles could be responsible for excess gamma-ray emission from the Galactic center. I will summarize recent results, outstanding questions, and upcoming advancements in the study of the Milky Way's dark companions.

Digging into the Large Scale Structure of the Universe
February 8, 2017 cancelled | ERC 161 | 3:00 PM
Shirley Ho, Berkeley Lab/ BCCP / Carnegie Mellon

CANCELLED

Galaxy spectroscopic surveys provide the means to map out this cosmic large-scale structure in three dimensions, furnishing a cornerstone of observational cosmology. The information is given in the form of galaxy locations, and is typically condensed into a single function of scale, such as the galaxy correlation function or power-spectrum. However, galaxy correlation functions are not the only information those surveys provide. One of the most striking features of N-body simulations is the network of filaments into which dark matter particles arrange themselves. We however traditionally only use the information contained in the positions of the galaxies, and in some occasions, we look at other cosmic structures of the Universe such as voids.
In this colloquium, I explore the information beyond the galaxy positions in large sky surveys combining novel ideas with recent techniques in statistical methods and machine learning algorithms. In particular, we will investigate the following two topics: the ''cosmic web'' that are mostly ignored in any large scale structure analyses in the Universe and how it affects the surrounding galaxies; and explores the additional information beyond the typical 2 point statistics by using novel statistical and machine learning techniques.

Digging into the Large Scale Structure of the Universe
March 1, 2017 cancelled | ERC 161 | 3:00 PM
Shirley Ho, Berkeley Lab/ BCCP / Carnegie Mellon

CANCELLED

Galaxy spectroscopic surveys provide the means to map out this cosmic large-scale structure in three dimensions, furnishing a cornerstone of observational cosmology. The information is given in the form of galaxy locations, and is typically condensed into a single function of scale, such as the galaxy correlation function or power-spectrum. However, galaxy correlation functions are not the only information those surveys provide. One of the most striking features of N-body simulations is the network of filaments into which dark matter particles arrange themselves. We however traditionally only use the information contained in the positions of the galaxies, and in some occasions, we look at other cosmic structures of the Universe such as voids.
In this colloquium, I explore the information beyond the galaxy positions in large sky surveys combining novel ideas with recent techniques in statistical methods and machine learning algorithms. In particular, we will investigate the following two topics: the ''cosmic web'' that are mostly ignored in any large scale structure analyses in the Universe and how it affects the surrounding galaxies; and explores the additional information beyond the typical 2 point statistics by using novel statistical and machine learning techniques.

News from PICO and COHERENT
April 5, 2017 | ERC 401 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Juan I. Collar, University of Chicago

Video
I will discuss the most recent results from PICO, a search for WIMP dark matter using bubble chambers, as well as future plans and some exciting lines of related research. I will then move on to cover COHERENT, an ongoing effort at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source to detect and exploit coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, soon to produce first results. The "glue" between these two subjects will be an elaboration on the overlap in techniques and methods used in modern neutrino and astroparticle physics. Abundant examples of this cross-talk will be provided.

Observing, Mapping and Mocking our Cosmic Beginnings
April 19, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
J. Richard Bond, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto

Video
I will give my take on the phenomenology (and yes theory) of inflation as revealed in Planck and other CMB) and LSS experiments, but with an eye to the glorious CMB future of AdvACT, CCAT-p, Simons Observatory, Stage 4, and the LSS of Euclid, Chime, and much more besides that we mock. Apart from displaying linear and quadratic maps of the primordial universe, a compression of what we now know, i will chat about CMB/LSS anomalies, in practice and in theory, pointing to post-inflation chaotic dynamical systems that can lead to subdominant non-Gaussian signals unlike the ones we have put such stringent constraints on with Planck 2015; and relate everything to non-equilibrium entropies, including the formation of all cosmic structure.

Fast Radio Bursts!
May 17, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Albert Stebbins, Fermilab

Video
On a human scale most astronomical sources are large and vary slowly. They must be large enough to produce enough light be to seen at astronomical distances and the light travel time across a large source limits the timescale for observable variations. Nevertheless in recent years extremely rapidly varying radio emission has been detected and found to be a common phenomena. The most extreme case has timescales as small as one nanosecond, inferred size smaller than one meter, peak luminosity exceeding that of the Sun, and is observed at a distance of 2kpc. More numerous and further away are Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), originating at cosmological distances, lasting a millisecond and arriving at Earth a few times a minute. These events are the brightest sources known in terms of an off-scale brightness temperature, yet the emission mechanism is undetermined. I will discuss some ideas for the origin of this emission and how these bright bursts could be used to augment gravitational wave and neutrino astronomy as well as the study of cosmological parameters and the intergalactic medium.

Automated Object Classification for Large Scale Future Surveys: A Strong Lensing Example with Machine Learning
May 24, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Camille Avestruz, University of Chicago

Video
Gravitational lensing offers a direct probe of the underlying mass distribution of lensing systems, a window to the high redshift universe, and a geometric probe of cosmological models. The advent of large scale surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope and Euclid has prompted a need for automatic and efficient identification of strong lensing systems. We present (1) (ALL) Automated Lensing Learner, a strong lensing identification pipeline that will be publicly released as open source software, and (2) a publicly available mock LSST dataset with strong galaxy-galaxy lenses. In this first application of the pipeline, we employ a fast feature extraction method, Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), to capture edge patterns that are characteristic of strong gravitational arcs in galaxy-galaxy lensing. We use logistic regression to train a supervised classifier model on the HOG of HST- and LSST-like images. Our tests demonstrate an efficient and effective method for automatically identifying strong lenses that captures much of the complexity of the arc finding problem. The linear classifier both runs on a personal laptop and can easily scale to large data sets on a computing cluster, all while using existing open source tools.

Mapping the Cosmos with the Dark Energy Survey - sneak peek of the first year weak lensing results
May 31, 2017 | ERC Auditorium 161 | 3:30 PM
Image credit: Andreas Papadopoulos
Click on the image to enlarge
Chihway Chang, University of Chicago

Video
Weak gravitational lensing, or weak lensing, is one of the most powerful tools in cosmology. The technique relies on measuring accurately the shape of a large number of galaxies, and statistically translating the shape measurements into (dark matter) mass distributions. The first year data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1) provides the most powerful weak lensing dataset to date. In this talk I will first give an update on the status of the cosmology analysis from DES Y1 data and present some preliminary results. Next, I will describe our work in generating and testing the wide-field weak lensing mass maps from the galaxy shape measurements and some exciting applications for the maps. I will end with thoughts on how weak lensing could also inform us on various topics of galaxy formation, which is essential for completing the story behind the Universe we see today.

First observation of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering
September 27, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Grayson C Rich, Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab

The process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) was predicted in 1974 by D.Z. Freedman, who suggested that attempts to detect CEvNS “may be an act of hubris” due to several profound experimental challenges. More than 40 years after its initial description, the world’s smallest functional neutrino detector has been used by the COHERENT Collaboration to produce the first observation of the process: a 14.6-kg CsI[Na] scintillator was deployed to the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Lab and observed, with high significance, evidence for a CEvNS process in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model. I will discuss CEvNS and its connection to a range of exciting physics, including: its potential role in supernova dynamics; the possibility to use neutrinos as a tool for studying nuclear structure and neutron stars; its relationship to upcoming direct searches for WIMP dark matter; and the ways in which CEvNS could offer insight into physics beyond the Standard Model. The experimental program and the recent result from the COHERENT Collaboration will be presented along with ongoing efforts within the collaboration and future plans.

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

The Limits of Cosmology
October 11, 2017 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Joe Silk, IAP/JHU

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

Cosmology results from Planck
January 24, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Silvia Galli, IAP

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

TBA
February 7, 2018
Peter Adshead, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Simons Observatory
May 23, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Brian Keating, UC San Diego

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.