KICP Colloquia
KICP Wednesday Colloquia - Usually Wednesdays, 3:30 PM, ERC 161, unless otherwise specified. Reception starts at 4:30 PM in ERC 161. For more information visit the KICP website.

Current & Future KICP Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
January 24, 2018Citizen Science Frontiers: Efficiency, Engagement, and Serendipitous Discovery with Human-Machine SystemsLaura Trouille, The Adler Planetarium and Northwestern University
February 7, 2018TBAPeter Adshead, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
March 14, 2018Dark Matter in the UniverseKatherine Freese, University of Michigan
April 4, 2018(KICP) ColloquiumRush D Holt, AAAS
April 11, 2018Cosmology results from PlanckSilvia Galli, IAP
May 23, 2018The Simons ObservatoryBrian Keating, UC San Diego

Past KICP Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
January 10, 2018From Emergent Gravity to Dark Energy and Dark MatterErik P. Verlinde, University of Amsterdam

From Emergent Gravity to Dark Energy and Dark Matter
January 10, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Erik P. Verlinde, University of Amsterdam

Video
The observed deviations from the laws of gravity of Newton and Einstein in galaxies and clusters can logically speaking be either due to unseen dark matter or due to a change in the way gravity works. Until recently there was little reason to doubt that general relativity correctly describes gravity in these circumstances. In the past few years insights from black hole physics and string theory have lead to a new theoretical framework in which the gravitational laws are derived an underlying microscopic quantum description of spacetime. An essential ingredient in the derivation of the Einstein equations is that the quantum entanglement of the vacuum obeys an area law, a condition that is known to hold in Anti-de Sitter space. In a Universe that is dominated by positive dark energy, like de Sitter space, the microscopic entanglement entropy contains, in addition to the area law, a volume law contribution whose total contribution equals the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy associated with the cosmological horizon. We will argue that this extra volume law contribution leads to modifications in the emergent laws of gravity, and provide evidence for the fact that these modifications explain the observed phenomena in galaxies and clusters currently attributed to dark matter. We end with a discussion of the possible implications for early cosmology, the CMB and structure formation.

Citizen Science Frontiers: Efficiency, Engagement, and Serendipitous Discovery with Human-Machine Systems
January 24, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Click on the image to enlarge
Laura Trouille, The Adler Planetarium and Northwestern University

The Zooniverse is the world's largest and most successful scientific crowdsourcing platform, engaging more than 1.6 million volunteers in tasks including classifying galaxies, discovering planets, transcribing artist's notebooks, and tracking resistance to antibiotics. Processing our increasingly large datasets poses a bottleneck for producing real scientific outcomes. Citizen science - engaging the public in research - provides a solution, particularly when coupled with machine learning algorithms and sophisticated task allocation. Faced with a rapidly growing demand for citizen science projects, Zooniverse launched its 'Project Builder' which allows you, the researcher, to build your own project in-house for free using the Zooniverse infrastructure and tools. In this talk I will discuss the frontiers of citizen science, including Zooniverse innovations in human-machine integration coupled with community engagement -- and the related open questions. I will also provide a brief tutorial on building your own crowdsourcing project.

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

TBA
February 7, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Peter Adshead, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dark Matter in the Universe
March 14, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Katherine Freese, University of Michigan

“What is the Universe made of?” This question is the longest outstanding problem in all of modern physics, and it is one of the most important research topics in cosmology and particle physics today. The bulk of the mass in the Universe is thought to consist of a new kind of dark matter particle, and the hunt for its discovery in on. I'll start by discussing the evidence for the existence of dark matter in galaxies, and then show how it fits into a big picture of the Universe containing 5% atoms, 25% dark matter, and 70% dark energy. Neutrinos only constitute ½% of the content of the Universe, but much can be learned about neutrino properties from cosmological data. Leading candidates for the dark matter are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), axions, and sterile neutrinos. WIMPs are a generic class of particles that are electrically neutral and do not participate in strong interactions, yet have weak-scale interactions with ordinary matter. There are multiple approaches to experimental searches for WIMPS: at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva; in underground laboratory experiments; with astrophysical searches for dark matter annihilation products, and upcoming searches with the James Webb Space Telescope for Dark Stars, early stars powered by WIMP annihilation. Current results are puzzling and the hints of detection will be tested soon. At the end of the talk I'll briefly turn to dark energy and its effect on the fate of the Universe.

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

(KICP) Colloquium
April 4, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Rush D Holt, AAAS

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

Cosmology results from Planck
April 11, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Silvia Galli, IAP

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

The Simons Observatory
May 23, 2018 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM
Brian Keating, UC San Diego

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.