Colloquia: 2019
Current & Future Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
January 23, 2019
KICP Colloquium
A New Frontier in the Search for Dark MatterGordan Krnjaic, Fermilab
January 30, 2019
Astronomy Colloquium
TBAIan Crossfield, MIT
February 13, 2019
Astronomy Colloquium
TBARoger Blandford, Stanford University
February 20, 2019
KICP Colloquium
TBDHirosi Ooguri, Caltech & Kavli IPMU
February 27, 2019
Astronomy Colloquium
TBAMansi Kasliwal, Caltech
March 13, 2019
Astronomy Colloquium
TBAMark Vogelsberger, MIT

Past Colloquia
DateTalk TitleSpeaker
January 16, 2019
Astronomy Colloquium
Cosmic ReionizationNick Gnedin, University of Chicago/Fermilab
January 9, 2019
KICP Colloquium
How many numbers does it take to determine our Universe?Michael Turner, KICP

How many numbers does it take to determine our Universe?
January 9, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | KICP Colloquium
Click on the image to enlarge
Michael Turner, KICP

Video
Since 2013, the Planck Surveyor team has made a good case that it takes six numbers to describe the whole Universe (fewer than the ten digits in a phone number), based upon their all-sky map of the CMB. Others have different opinions: zero, one, two, six (a different), and nine to describe our Universe. As I will discuss, the choice of numbers reveals much about what we know and our aspirations, as well as how we think about the Universe. After exploring the landscape, I will advocate for zero numbers and discuss the path and strategy to get there.

Cosmic Reionization
January 16, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | Host: Hsiao-Wen Chen | Astronomy Colloquium
Click on the image to enlarge
Nick Gnedin, University of Chicago/Fermilab

Cosmic reionization - ionization of the bulk of cosmic gas by ultraviolet radiation from first galaxies and quasars - is the least explored epoch in cosmic history. While significant progress has been made recently with the HST Frontier Fields program, the major breakthrough is still in the future, but not a distant one. The launch of JWST will start a revolution in studies of cosmic reionization, and other advanced observational probes will follow soon.

As observers are preparing for the flood of new data, theorists are currently busy revamping their tools to stay on par with future observations. This fortunate match between theory and observations will lead to a major breakthrough in this last cosmic frontier.

A New Frontier in the Search for Dark Matter
January 23, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | KICP Colloquium
Gordan Krnjaic, Fermilab

The gravitational evidence for the existence of dark matter is overwhelming; observations of galactic rotation curves, the CMB power spectrum, and light element abundances independently suggest that over 80% of all matter is "dark" and beyond the scope of the Standard Model. However, its particle nature is currently unknown, so discovering its potential non-gravitational interactions is a major priority in fundamental physics. In this talk, I will survey the landscape of light dark matter theories and and introduce an emerging field of fixed-target experiments that are poised to cover hitherto unexplored dark matter candidates with MeV-GeV masses. These new techniques involve direct dark matter production with proton, electron, and *muon* beams at various facilities including Fermilab, CERN, SLAC, and JLab. Exploring this mass range is essential for fully testing a broad, predictive class of theories in which dark matter abundance arises from dark-visible interactions in thermal equilibrium in the early universe.

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

TBA
January 30, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | Astronomy Colloquium
Ian Crossfield, MIT

Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge

TBA
February 13, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | Astronomy Colloquium
Roger Blandford, Stanford University

Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge

TBD
February 20, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | KICP Colloquium
Hirosi Ooguri, Caltech & Kavli IPMU

Reception at 4:30 PM in the ERC 401.

TBA
February 27, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | Astronomy Colloquium
Mansi Kasliwal, Caltech

Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge

TBA
March 13, 2019 | ERC 161 | 3:30 PM | Astronomy Colloquium
Mark Vogelsberger, MIT

Refreshments served at 4:45 PM, Hubble Lounge