The New Cosmology: From Quantum Fuzz to the Accelerating Universe

About the Instructors

Michael S. Turner is the Rauner Distinguished Service Professor and Chair of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics at The University of Chicago and Staff Scientist at Fermilab. He is a theoretical cosmologist whose research is concerned with the earliest moments of the Universe and has made important contributions to our understanding of dark matter, inflationary cosmology, the cosmic microwave background, and the formation of structure in the Universe. Among his awards are the Quantrell Prize for Undergraduate teaching and the Lilienfeld Prize of the APS for research contributions and exceptional skill in their presentation to diverse audiences. He is a member of both American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Randall H. Landsberg is the Director of Outreach for the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics at The University of Chicago as well the Director for Education and Public Outreach for the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA). His work in science education focuses on hands-on laboratory experiences, and has involved a wide variety of formal and informal programs including displays for the Museum of Science and Industry, Science Vans, teacher enhancement institutes, short courses on diverse topics such as microscale chemistry and forensics, and IAEA training courses.

Stephan S. Meyer is a Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. His research is centered on measurements of the anisotropy and spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation with satellite and balloon-borne instruments. He is a member of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) satellite science team and is Associate Director of the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA).

John E. Carlstrom is the S. Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at The University of Chicago and the Director of the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA). His research concerns interferometric studies of the cosmic microwave background, and measurements of the S-Z effect. He is a MacArthur Fellow and the winner of a McDonnell Centennial Fellowship. Dr. Carlstrom is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Bruce Winstein is the Samuel K. Allision Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Chicago. He is recognized for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of the violation of the symmetry between matter and antimatter through experiments involving K mesons at Fermilab. Dr. Winstein's research now focuses on measuring the polarization of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scott Dodelson is Deputy Head of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group at Fermilab and Associate Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. His research is focused on testing fundamental physics with cosmological observations. His textbook on the large scale structure of the universe and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is due out in 2003.

Evalyn Gates is the Director of Astronomy at the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum and a Senior Research Associate at the University of Chicago. Her current research interests include particle astrophysics and the search for dark matter. During her 4 years as Director of Astronomy she has established an Astronomy Department at the Adler that includes research astronomers and astrophysicists working at the forefront of research in such fields as stellar formation, galactic structure and cosmic ray astrophysics. Her work at the Planetarium has also included the development of new exhibit galleries such as the Milky Way Galaxy Gallery and the Pritzker Gallery of Cosmology.

Wayne Hu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. His research interests include the theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background, gravitational lensing and the large-scale structure of the universe. He is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the winner of the Warner Prize of the American Astronomical Society.

Sean Carroll is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago. His research ranges over a number of topics in theoretical physics, focusing on cosmology, field theory, particle physics, and gravitation. He has been awarded fellowships from the Sloan and Packard foundations, as well as the MIT Graduate Student Council Teaching Award.

Mark U. SubbaRao is a Research Scientist in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. His research interests include statistical properties of galaxies, the large-scale structure of the universe and scientific visualization. He is also a software developer for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectroscopic Pipeline.

Roger Dixon is a staff Scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Presently he is the Project Manager for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search. Besides particle astrophysics he has been involved in the Dzero Collider detector and several fixed target experiments since coming to the lab some time during the second half of the last century. Also active in the Fermilab education and outreach efforts, he currently is the organizer for the Saturday Morning Physics program and Fermilab's internship program for undergraduate physics majors.

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